PARASITISM and HOST BEHAVIOUR by J.M. Behnke, C F Barnard

By J.M. Behnke, C F Barnard

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1978, Journal of Theoretical Biology, 73, 247–270. , 1976, Ducks, Geese and Swans of North America (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: Stackpole Books). L. , 1964, Journal of Wildlife Management, 28, 661–676. J. , 1979, Animal Behaviour, 27, 487–514. J. , 1979, Behaviour, 71, 203–245. Campbell (New York: Plenum Press). , 1974, Comptes rendus des Séances de L‘Academie des Sciences Paris D, 278, 2803–2806. , 1973, General Parasitology (New York: Academic Press). W. , 1979, Journal of Wildlife Management, 43, 347–348.

A detector may be, for instance, a predator, a host immune system or a member of a mate-choosing sex and the corresponding detectee a potential prey individual, an invading parasite and a member of the candidate sex. Barnard (1984b) discusses this further and develops a general model of the evolution of detector/detectee relationships and the cues used in discrimination. While detector/detectee relationships can be viewed as the driving force behind the evolution of broad phenotypic characteristics such as crypsis and elaborate secondary sexual characters, they may also be a major selection pressure favouring inter- and intraspecific scrounging.

1964, Journal of Wildlife Management, 28, 661–676. J. , 1979, Animal Behaviour, 27, 487–514. J. , 1979, Behaviour, 71, 203–245. Campbell (New York: Plenum Press). , 1974, Comptes rendus des Séances de L‘Academie des Sciences Paris D, 278, 2803–2806. , 1973, General Parasitology (New York: Academic Press). W. , 1979, Journal of Wildlife Management, 43, 347–348. , 1973, Biological Reviews, 48, 27–83. B. and Brooke, M. , 1989, Journal of Animal Ecology, 58, 225–236. , 1982, Zeitschrift fur Tierpsychologie, 58, 185–202.

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